Oakland International Airport Terminal 2 Expansion and Renovatio, Oakland, California

Location:
Oakland, California.

Sustainable Design Assistance and Energy Analysis:
Aditi Raychoudhury, Architectural Energy Corporation, San Francisco, California.
Erik Kolderup, Architectural Energy Corporation, San Francisco, California.

Client:
Port of Oakland Authority, Oakland, California.

Oakland International Airport in Oakland, California, is one of the three airports serving the San Francisco Bay Area. As one of the nation’s fastest growing airports, a $1.4 billion dollar expansion project was launched to renovate and expand Terminal 2 to improve operation and add of five gates to Terminal 2. It also included the addition of a new mechanical building to house the additional services to serve the renovated and expanded Terminal 2.

http://www.flyoakland.com/media_photos.shtml
Oakland Airport. Source: http://www.flyoakland.com/media_photos.shtml

I was involved with the analysis, design and recommendation of appropriate sustainable design strategies to lower operating energy costs, improve daylight and indoor air quality, and reduce carbon emissions. The resulting recommendations reduced the energy consumption by 36% relative to the proposed design before energy analysis and recommendations.

Some of the prominent sustainable design strategies that were recommended included:

-Daylight design with the use of appropriate glazing, light shelves, clerestories, and skylights to extend and maximize daylight distribution deep into the space

-Efficient lighting design and controls, including the use of daylight controls to control the level of electric lighting based on daylight availability

-Efficient air-conditioning strategies such as variable air flow regulated by air-conditioning demands, reduced energy fan operation through reduced pressure in the air supply and return system by using appropriate air duct and filter design, carbon dioxide sensors to regulate supply air flow based on number of occupants, and optimizing chiller size, and reducing chiller energy consumption with variable demand controlled water flow.

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