Women’s March. January 20, 2018

First, we marched. Now, are you ready to run? Print this 11 x 14 image of  The United Faces of America for Women’s March 2018  and print it off your printer. Take it to the streets and claim Justice and Equality for All ! Please spread the word. Thank you!

Aditi Raychoudhury. The United Faces of America (Color). 2017.
Aditi Raychoudhury. The United Faces of America (Color). 2017.

 

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Agitprop – Part Deux

The United Faces of America. 2017. Image for 3-color screenprint.
The United Faces of America. 2017. Image for 3-color screenprint.
The United Faces of America. 2017. Image for 3-color screenprint.

Reduced the original image

Aditi Raychoudhury. Resist. 2016. Adobe Illustrator.
Aditi Raychoudhury. Resist. 2016. Adobe Illustrator.

 

for a 3-color screenprint that I will be making 100 copies of as part of the Agitprop residency sponsored by the Compound Gallery.

The Compound Gallery is funding this Residency out of its own funding to help artist create art with traditional printmaking techniques (e.g., letterpress, silkscreen, etching, relief, photopolymer plates) and building a bridge between printmaking’s historic relationship to generating social/cultural/political awareness and contemporary social media/online forums. If you want to support what they do by either donating ink, paper, supplies, or monetary funds, you can do so by clicking HERE.  They are fiscally sponsored via Fractured Atlas, a 501(c)(3) public charity. Contributions for the purposes of The Compound Gallery are tax-deductible to the extent permitted by law.

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Grateful for the Agitprop Residency at the Compound Gallery

Aditi Raychoudhury. Resist. 2016. Adobe Illustrator.

I am grateful to the Compound Gallery for offering me a spot in their Agitprop Residency program 

What is Agitprop? Its Printing for a cause. Thinking. Making. Disseminating. 1 individual, 1 month, 100 Prints.

I will be printing the United Faces of America as a 3-color screenprint over the next month.

 

Aditi Raychoudhury. Resist. 2016. Adobe Illustrator.
Aditi Raychoudhury. Resist. 2016. Adobe Illustrator.

 

 

The Compound Gallery is funding this Residency out of its own funding to help artist create art with traditional printmaking techniques (e.g., letterpress, silkscreen, etching, relief, photopolymer plates) and building a bridge between printmaking’s historic relationship to generating social/cultural/political awareness and contemporary social media/online forums. If you want to support what they do by either donating ink, paper, supplies, or monetary funds, you can do so by clicking HERE.  They are fiscally sponsored via Fractured Atlas, a 501(c)(3) public charity. Contributions for the purposes of The Compound Gallery are tax-deductible to the extent permitted by law.

Day of Remembrance: Ben Sakugochi

 

Ben Sakugochi. Post Cards from Camp: White Man's Neighbourhood. 16
Ben Sakugochi. Post Cards from Camp: White Man’s Neighbourhood. 16″ x 11″. Acrylic on Canvas.

I was in Los Angeles for the President’s Day weekend and was fortunate enough to catch the last day of Drawing the Line at the Japanese American National Museum, in Los Angeles, California. Drawing the Line was part of Pacific Standard Time – an unprecedented collaboration, initiated by the Getty, to bring together more than sixty cultural institutions from across Southern California for six months from October – April 2011 to tell the story of the birth of the L.A. art scene. Los Angeles, can be pretty cool that way. The exhibition was a selection of the dynamic and diverse Japanese American contributions to the visual landscape of L.A. in the period following World War II. 

Two of my favorite artists were Ben Sakugochi and Qris Yamashita.

Ben Sakoguchi was born in 1938, in San Bernardino California.  During World War II, his family was incarcerated by the United States government because of their Japanese ancestry, so he spent his early childhood in an internment camp at Poston, Arizona.

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My poster at the same show with art by Lawrence Ferlinghetti sold for 350$. Double Gulp!

My screen-printed poster the was up for auction at the Art Auction With Impact along with work by Lawrence Ferlinghetti show this past Saturday (22nd October, 2016) in San Francisco sold for 350$. You can have it for 30$ 🙂 (plus shipping). I can give you a shipping discount if you are local.

Aditi Raychoudhury. Tree of Life. 2014. Limited Edition Screenprint.
Aditi Raychoudhury. Tree of Life. 2014. Limited Edition Screenprint.

 

My poster at the same show with art by Lawrence Ferlinghetti. Gulp!

I have a little limited edition screen-printed poster up for auction along with work by Lawrence Ferlinghetti at the Art Auction With Impact show this Saturday (22nd October, 2016) in San Francisco. If you can’t afford work by Ferlinghetti, you will definitely be able to afford work by me. Check it out! Respond via Facebook. Buy tickets via Eventbrite.

 

Aditi Raychoudhury. Tree of Life. 2014. Limited Edition Screenprint.
Aditi Raychoudhury. Tree of Life. 2014. Limited Edition Screenprint.

Inching Towards Watercolors

Aditi Raychoudhury. Thank you for the NibMor love. Clearly the way to my curmudgeonly heart is through More Nib Mor. 2016. Watercolor on paper.
Aditi Raychoudhury. More Nib Mor Please. 2016. Watercolor on paper.

I have been watching with much admiration Lisa Brown posting a watercolor sketch every single day. I was so inspired to learn that she has committed to making one every single day since 2014 that I made a gingerly stroke, and then another and another.. here is the result. I have a long way to go.. but its a start.

Aditi Raychoudhury. Thank you for the NibMor love. Clearly the way to my curmudgeonly heart is through More Nib Mor. 2016. Pencil Sketch.
Aditi Raychoudhury. Thank you for the NibMor. Clearly the way to my curmudgeonly heart is through More Nib Mor. 2016. Pencil Sketch.

Satyajit Ray Trilogy (Part Two): “The Apu Trilogy” Story Boards

Satyajit Ray. Birth of Apu. Watercolors.
Satyajit Ray. Birth of Apu. Watercolors.

Four weeks ago, I had published a post about the painstaking restoration of the Apu Trilogy by Bologna’s L’Imagine Ritrovata, using negatives that had been for a good part destroyed by a July 1993 fire in London’s Henderson’s Film Laboratories where the  original negatives of The Apu Trilogy were stored.

Between the lab, a duplicate negative and digital remastering, The Apu Trilogy, has been  restored to its former glory.

And, this summer, we shall see the sketches, notes and scribbles that culminated in this groundbreaking trilogy. The Pather Panchali Sketchbook has been culled together from posters, sketches and on-location photographs of the 1965 release, and a scanned copy of the sketchbook Satyajit Ray had donated to the Cinematheque Francais in Paris.

Satyajit Ray. The Iconic Train Scene. Watercolors.
Satyajit Ray. The Iconic Train Scene. Watercolors.
Satyajit Ray. The Iconic Train Scene. Watercolors.
Satyajit Ray. The Iconic Train Scene. Watercolors.

 Which child, who grew up in India before air travel became the norm, can forget the joy of traveling by train through India? A joy that swelled in equal measure on both sides of that barred train window, and was expressed through waves exchanged between the rural children who stared at this iron beast speeding through their fields and little passengers like me who delighted in their lush green pond-filled villages.


 

The Pather Panchali Sketchbook provides a glimpse of how Ray imagined his adaptation of Bibhutibhushan Bandyopadhyay’s novel of the same name to be. The publication includes Ray’s original drawings that served as the visual blueprint for the screenplay, photographs of the cast and crew on location, and his illustrations from Aam Aantir Bhenpu, a children’s edition of the novel.

He did some sketches in a drawing book after he had come back from London in 1950 and illustrated a succession of pictures (in pen, brush and ink) for the sequences of frames as they would come up in the film. He used to take them to the producers and explain the sequences. The producers he approached, however, had no interest, nor could they understand the whole process.

Some of the shot divisions were scribbled on chits of paper and cigarette packs.

-Excerpted from Rare sketches and photos of the making of Satyajit Ray’s ‘Pather Panchali’


 

While most of the world’s attention stays on the The Apu Trilogy, I remember seeing his sketches in a book that came out in the 80s and has been updated since – Satyajit Ray: The Inner Eye: The Biography of a Master Film-Maker, that captured not just his directorial genius, but, was an attempt to deal with a Renaissance man: a writer, composer, artist, typeface, graphic and set designer, and film maker. This particular one, of the dishevelled, crazed Doyamoyi from Debi, has always stayed in my memory.

Satyajit Ray. Debi.
Satyajit Ray. Debi.

 

Satyajit Ray Trilogy: Part One – “The Apu Trilogy” Available on Streaming

Satyajit Ray. Anu Trilogy. 1956.
Satyajit Ray. Anu Trilogy. 1956.

Yesterday I was looking for covers of Sandesh (Children’s Magazine), which, were designed by Satyajit Ray. Today I see this. “Although it premiered 60 years ago this week at the Museum of Modern Art, Satyajit Ray‘s Pather Panchali remains among both the most accomplished of debuts and cinema’s most universally relatable experiences. Accentuating the basics of human emotions to result in the most complex of reactions, Ray’s subsequent trilogy of films follows the hardships of a Bengali boy as he passes into adulthood, a delicately powerful tale of transition that’s now been gloriously restored.” BEST.TRILOGY.EVER. Now you can watch it on Amazon. That man was talented beyond belief – artist, movie maker, typographer, set designer, writer, storyboard artist…. anything in the arts- he had done it fabulously, and on a shoestring budget, no less – well…. hmm.. he didn’t act. More on the Trilogy here.