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Mimi, the Little Umbrella

29 May Aditi Raychoudhury. On a Very Bury. Busy Town, Busy Street, Busy Store, Mimi Panoramic. 2015. Adobe Illustrator.

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“In a very busy town…

Aditi Raychoudhury. A Very Busy Town. 2015. Adobe Illustrator.

Aditi Raychoudhury. A Very Busy Town. 2015. Adobe Illustrator.

On a very busy street…

Aditi Raychoudhury. A Very Busy Street. 2015. Adobe Illustrator.

Aditi Raychoudhury. A Very Busy Street. 2015. Adobe Illustrator.

Was a very busy little umbrella store … with many fancy umbrellas!

Aditi Raychoudhury. A Very Busy Store. 2015. Adobe Illustrator.

Aditi Raychoudhury. A Very Busy Store. 2015. Adobe Illustrator.

At the very back of this umbrella store, lived a little umbrella named Mimi. But, Mimi wasn’t fancy at all… in fact, she was just a plain black umbrella. But Mimi had a secret, which, made her special… very special indeed.

Aditi Raychoudhury. Mimi. 2015. Adobe Illustrator.

Aditi Raychoudhury. Mimi. 2015. Adobe Illustrator.

Aditi Raychoudhury. Town, Street, Store, Mimi. Adobe Illustrator.

Aditi Raychoudhury. Town, Street, Store, Mimi. Adobe Illustrator.

Aditi Raychoudhury. On a Very Bury. Busy Town, Busy Street, Busy Store, Mimi Panoramic. 2015. Adobe Illustrator.

Aditi Raychoudhury. On a Very Bury. Busy Town, Busy Street, Busy Store, Mimi Panoramic. 2015. Adobe Illustrator.

On rainy days, lots of people came into the umbrella store to buy, well …umbrellas! And the shopkeeper would always show them his fanciest umbrellas”….

….”But, the shopkeeper never showed plain little Mimi to anyone… and no one even asked for her.
So, she just lived quietly at the back of the store, waiting for the right person to come along.”….

Does the right person come along? Does Mimi ever get to leave the store? What made Mimi special? What is her SECRET?

I am not telling till some one publishes this story… till then.. here are some illustrations/sketches of work in progress.

Aditi Raychoudhury. Very Busy Street. 2014. Pencil on Tracing.

Aditi Raychoudhury. Very Busy Street. 2014. Pencil on Tracing.

Aditi Raychoudhury. Busy Little Umbrella Store (With Baskets). 2014. Adobe Illustrator CS5.

Aditi Raychoudhury. Busy Little Umbrella Store (With Baskets). 2014. Adobe Illustrator CS5.

Aditi Raychoudhury. Busy Little Umbrella Store (Without Baskets). 2014. Adobe Illustrator CS5.

Aditi Raychoudhury. Busy Little Umbrella Store (Without Baskets). 2014. Adobe Illustrator CS5.

Busy Little Umbrella Store

Aditi Raychoudhury. Busy Little Umbrella Store. 2013. Pencil.

Character sketches –

Aditi Raychoudhury. Blue Boy with Mamma. 2013. Adobe Illustrator.

Aditi Raychoudhury. Blue Boy with Mamma. 2013. Adobe Illustrator.

Aditi Raychoudhury. Blue Boy with Mamma. 2013. Pencil on Paper.

Aditi Raychoudhury. Blue Boy with Mamma. 2013. Pencil on Paper.

Aditi Raychoudhury. Dad with Stroller and Runaway Girl. 2013. Adobe Illustrator.

Aditi Raychoudhury. Dad with Stroller and Runaway Girl. 2013. Adobe Illustrator.

Aditi Raychoudhury. Close-up of Runaway Girl. 2013. Adobe Illustrator.

Aditi Raychoudhury. Close-up of Runaway Girl. 2013. Adobe Illustrator.

Aditi Raychoudhury. Close-up of Dad. 2013. Adobe Illustrator.

Aditi Raychoudhury. Close-up of Dad. 2013. Adobe Illustrator.

Aditi Raychoudhury. Runaway Girl. 2013. Pencil on Paper.

Aditi Raychoudhury. Runaway Girl. 2013. Pencil on Paper.

Aditi Raychoudhury. Couple Behind Counter. 2013. Adobe Illustrator.

Aditi Raychoudhury. Couple Behind Counter. 2013. Adobe Illustrator.

Aditi Raychoudhury. Couple Behind Counter. 2013. Pencil on Paper.

Aditi Raychoudhury. Couple Behind Counter. 2013. Pencil on Paper.

Aditi Raychoudhury. Toddler Girl with Trench Coat Mamma. 2013. Adobe Illustrator.

Aditi Raychoudhury. Toddler Girl with Trench Coat Mamma. 2013. Adobe Illustrator.

Aditi Raychoudhury. Toddler Girl with Trench Coat Mamma (Refined). 2013. Blue Pencil on Tracing Paper.

Aditi Raychoudhury. Toddler Girl with Trench Coat Mamma (Refined). 2013. Blue Pencil on Tracing Paper.

Aditi Raychoudhury. Toddler Girl with Trench Coat Mamma. 2013. Adobe Illustrator.

Aditi Raychoudhury. Toddler Girl with Trench Coat Mamma. 2013. Pencil on Paper.

Aditi Raychoudhury. Exiting Mamma with Runaway Son. 2013. Adobe Illustrator.

Aditi Raychoudhury. Exiting Mamma with Runaway Son. 2013. Adobe Illustrator.

Aditi Raychoudhury. Exiting Mamma with Runaway Son. 2013. Pencil on Paper.

Aditi Raychoudhury. Exiting Mamma with Runaway Son. 2013. Pencil on Paper.

Aditi Raychoudhury. Tall Man With Umbrella. 2013. Adobe Illustrator.

Aditi Raychoudhury. Tall Man With Umbrella. 2013. Adobe Illustrator.

Tall man with Umbrella. 2013. Adobe Illustrator CS5.

Tall man with Umbrella. 2013. Adobe Illustrator CS5.

Aditi Raychoudhury. Trio. 2013. Adobe Illustrator CS5.

Aditi Raychoudhury. Trio. 2013. Adobe Illustrator CS5.

Trio. 2013. Pencil.

Trio. 2013. Pencil.

Aditi Raychoudhury. Smarty Panta Girl with Father. 2013. Adobe Illustrator.

Aditi Raychoudhury. Smarty Panta Girl with Father. 2013. Adobe Illustrator.

Aditi Raychoudhury. Smarty Pants Girl with Father. 2013. Pencil.

Aditi Raychoudhury. Smarty Pants Girl with Father. 2013. Pencil.

Aditi Raychoudhury. Smarty Pants Girl's Father. 2013. Pencil.

Aditi Raychoudhury. Smarty Pants Girl’s Father. 2013. Pencil.

Aditi Raychoudhury. Smarty Pants Girl. 2013. Pencil.

Aditi Raychoudhury. Smarty Pants Girl. 2013. Pencil.

The Bomb and The General V2.2009

18 Jul
Aditi Raychoudhury. Bushes. 2009. 6" x 4". Adobe Illustrator CS.

Aditi Raychoudhury. Bushes. 2009. 6″ x 4″. Adobe Illustrator CS.

The original ‘The Bomb and the General’ is a delightfully optimistic, anti-war children’s book – written by Umberto Eco (The Name of The Rose), and brilliantly illustrated by Eugenio Carmi. It was published in 1989 –

In Italian: By Gruppo Editoriale Fabbri, Bompiani, Sonzogno, Etas S.p.A.;
and
In English: By Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, Inc.

Inspired by the original story, this version retains some of the original text (italicized), and maintains a similar naïveté to create an anti-war message for children. For adults, its a more complex tale about hegemony and insular faith.

Aditi Raychoudhury. Land of Plenty. Adobe Illustrator CS. 2009.

Aditi Raychoudhury. Land of Plenty (In Green). 2009. 22″ x 11″. Adobe Illustrator CS.

The General of our story enjoys a life of ease and gluttony, till he is compelled to seek God, during a moment of personal crisis. This pivotal encounter awakens in him an unshakable passion for God’s word. But his myopic obsession with the minutiae of God’s message clouds its original intent, and provokes an ominous future. Will his country slumber on through the impending doom or will they arise to reclaim their right in a peaceful world?

Aditi Raychoudhury. Land of Plenty (In Pink). 2008. 17" x 14". Colored Pencils on Tracing Paper.

Aditi Raychoudhury. Land of Plenty (In Pink). 2009. 17″ x 14″. Colored Pencils on Tracing Paper.

Aditi Raychoudhury. Land of Plenty (In Primary Colors). 2009. 17" x 14". Colored Pencils on Tracing Paper.

Aditi Raychoudhury. Land of Plenty (In Primary Colors). 2009. 17″ x 14″. Colored Pencils on Tracing Paper.

Aditi Raychoudhury. Land of Plenty (In Orange). 2009. 17" x 14". Colored Pencils on Tracing Paper.

Aditi Raychoudhury. Land of Plenty (In Orange). 2009. 17″ x 14″. Colored Pencils on Tracing Paper.

Aditi Raychoudhury. Land of Plenty (In Orange). 2009. 17" x 14". Gouache on Paper.

Aditi Raychoudhury. Land of Plenty (In Orange). 2009. 17″ x 14″. Gouache on Paper.

Protected: People in the Park

8 May I love you, Fair City. Aditi Raychoudhury. 2/2014. iPad drawing using Paper by 53.

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Rwanda: Twenty Years Later – To Forget or Not to Forget?

30 Apr The skulls and bones of the genocide victims at a memorial inside a church at Ntarama, where 5000 victims sought refuge. (Source: Finbarr O'Reilly/Reuters)
The skulls and bones of  the genocide victims at a memorial inside a church at Ntarama, where 5000 victims sought refuge. (Source: Finbarr O'Reilly/Reuters)

The skulls and bones of the genocide victims at a memorial inside a church at Ntarama, where 5000 victims sought refuge. (Source: Finbarr O’Reilly/Reuters)

 

On April 7th, 2014, Rwandans commemorated the 20th anniversary of one of the worst massacres in history.

Seven years ago, I had written a paper on design as an aid for reconciliation and memorialization. Here is a revised and updated excerpt from that 190-pages long report .

 

Part 1: To Remember, or Not to Remember? 

I am young, I am twenty years old;
yet I know nothing of life but despair, death, fear,
and fatuous superficiality cast over an abyss of sorrow.
I see how peoples are set against one another,
and in silence, unknowingly,
foolishly, obediently, innocently slay one another.

– Paul Baumer in ‘All Quiet on the Western Front’ by Erich Maria Remarque, 1929

—–

Every year, in April, the rains fall heavy on Rwanda. The earth turns green. New life begins. It is the growing season. Twenty years ago, in April, along with the rains, came, not life, but death. The earth turned red – soaked with the blood of over a million Tutsis and Hutus.

Every year, the rains ebb in July – as did the genocide in 1994. Over ten percent of the population had been decimated by then – their bloated bodies floated down the freshly replenished Kagera river, and all the way to Lake Victoria. It was the most efficient mass killing since Hiroshima. In Hiroshima, they used bombs. In Rwanda, they used machetes.

Now, every year in April, along with the rains, comes “Kwibuka” (Rwandan for “Remember”) – a government driven effort to remember, reflect, reconcile and unite; an effort to restore dignity to the men, women and children who died; unborn babies, too, ripped out of wombs and smashed with unimaginable brutality. It is an effort to reflect on the neatly organized rows of fractured skulls, femurs, ribs and every other bony part that has been collectively memorialized.

But for those who survive, along with the rains, come a flood of memories – “of despair, death, fear and fatuous superficiality cast over an abyss of sorrow.”

Anger and bewilderment still hangs over Rwanda – just like those dark, rumbling clouds before the rains. The call for remembrance, reflection, reconciliation and unity is hard to heed. For many Rwandans, the rains haven’t come. Spring hasn’t come. Life hasn’t begun.

Marie-Jeanne was only 16 years old when the genocide started. Her entire family was slaughtered. For her, and many like her, the genocide never really ended. The stench of semen is still alive through her daughter, 20 year-old Kirezi, who is one of the 20,000 children born out of rape. It is still alive in her daily dose of anti-retorviral drugs, which, control her worst symptoms of HIV/AIDS – an illness contracted by nearly 2/3rds of the estimated 500,000 women who were brutally and repeatedly raped during the genocide.

Every year, as April approaches, Marie-Jeanne’s heart goes numb. She doesn’t want “Kwibuka”. All she wants to do is forget. 

Source: CNN

The genocide hasn’t ended either for those parents who will never see their children, and, the children who will never see their parents. But they are not eager to forget. They are actively looking for their families’  remains and the chance to give their dear ones a decent burial.

Niyonsenga Erick Rafiki was 4 years old when his father was killed. His memories of his father, he says, have grown hazy with time. But he, too, is eager to find out more about his father along with finding his father’s body. He has an unusual set of accomplices – his father’s killers. The genocide weighs heavy on the genocidaires. They are just as confused as the survivors. They don’t understand why they betrayed those who gave them their trust, and, butchered who they, too, loved. Helping in the search for their victim’s bodies is the only hope they have for repentance, healing and reconciliation.

Source: CNN

 

“It takes a very long time to become young.” ~ Picasso

17 Apr Inika Moni RayMukerji. Plane. 2013. Crayons on Paper
Pablo Picasso. Woman with a Book. 1932. Oil on Canvas.

Pablo Picasso. Woman with a Book. 1932. Oil on Canvas.

When my father died last summer, so did my childhood. Pouf! Just like that! And, very UNEXPECTEDLY. In that very moment as I stared at the slowly forming words, ” Your father passed away”. To this, and, with this one person in the world, I was, and, could always be, a child – not just middle-aged progeny, whose achievements (or lack there of) one could gloat or bemoan about. And his very last birthday wish to me (via Skype) said just as much.

Last message from Baba. March 20, 2013.

Last birthday wish from Baba via Skype. March 20, 2013. (A rasgulla is a spherical Bengali dessert)

It recalled an incident from nearly forty years ago. I was around two years old, and had been watching my brother, who had just started kindergarten, struggling to write his lower case “a” . Fluttering about him, I boasted that writing “a” was so easy that even I could do it. (Yes, kids can be insensitive!). During my last birthday, this incident was still fresh in his mind.

And, just like that 2-year-old, who hadn’t transcended the plasticity of time inside his mind, I continued to make demands long after I had left home. In the US, it was for the things that were almost impossible to find outside of Bengal – Gobindo Bhog Chaal (Rice), Shona Moongeyr Daal (Lentils), Moori (Bengali puffed rice), Mukhorochok (a sweet, salty, and sour snack mix) and Mokaibari tea. I knew that despite his failing health, and limited mobility, he would never fail me. And, sure as ever, he would arrive, with these common Bengali treats, packed in ( and sometimes, disastrously strewn all over) his suitcase. Along with them, would also arrive a few banal trinkets that weren’t special to anybody, but me.

When he died last year, 16 years after my mother did, not only did I become a middle-aged orphan – but, I also lost that last refuge where I could always be a child.

That child who led a simple life, in a simple town, in a simpler time. That child who spent most of her afternoons reading, drawing, chasing butterflies, climbing trees, eating guavas, and, running around the neighborhood sucking nectar out of wild flowers. That child, who stared, with wondrous rapture at the birds flying across a bright fuschia sky, and, knew that it was time to wander her way back home from the hills behind her house, where she had just whiled away many happy hours. That child whose heart burnt just as brightly as that spotless evening sky.

As a parent to a pre-schooler, I know that it may be many years before I can shrug-off the self-generated urge to stress over school, organize my space to mimic an IKEA display, and make my meals look like they had just jumped out of the pages of Vegetarian Times, and release my heart instead, to long afternoons amidst the wild flowers of California, and, sink my feet into the wet ocean sand.

On the other hand, as a parent to a pre-schooler, it might just be more possible than ever to relive those childhood wonders of peering through grass, looking for snails, squeezing my eyes as the ocean surf hits my face, and dissolving into laughter at the first lick of ice-cream on a hot day.

While I no longer draw with the passion and freedom that I did as a child, my daughter’s free forms lead me to where I want to be.

Here are some of the things she drew when she was a little over two years old.

 

Inika Moni RayMukerji. Plane. January 2013. Crayons on Paper

Inika Moni RayMukerji. Plane. January 2013. Crayons on Paper

Inika Moni RayMukerji. Whale. January 2013. Crayons on Paper

Inika Moni RayMukerji. Whale. January 2013. Crayons on Paper

Inika Moni RayMukerji. Pig. 2013. Crayons on Paper

Inika Moni RayMukerji. Pig. 2013. Crayons on Paper

Inika Moni RayMukerji. Pig. 2013. Crayons on Paper

Inika Moni RayMukerji. Pig. 2013. Crayons on Paper

Inika Moni RayMukerji. Helicopter. 2013. Crayons on Paper

Inika Moni RayMukerji. Helicopter. 2013. Crayons on Paper

 

 

Picasso had said, “It took me four years to paint like Raphael, but a lifetime to paint like a child.” May be by the time she is my age,  I will learn to draw and laugh like her again. 

—-

Afternote:

This song really resonates with my sense of wanting to get out of the straitjacket of adulthood. Altho, I don’t think I will ever ever make my bed in a disused car… Enjoy the song, anyway!

Well I’m sick of this town, this blind man’s forage
They take your dreams down and stick them in storage
You can have them back son when you’ve paid off your mortgage and loans
Oh hell with this place, I’ll go it my own way
I’ll stick out my thumb and I trudge down the highway
Someday someone must be going my way home

Till then I’ll make my bed from a disused car
With a mattress of leaves and a blanket of stars
And I’ll stitch the words into my heart with a needle and thread
Don’t you cry for the lost
Smile for the living
Get what you need and give what you’re given
You know life’s for the living so live it.

 

 

 

 

Sanjay Patel

17 Apr Sanjay Patel. Ramayana Book Cover. Chronicle Books. 2010.
Sanjay Patel. Ramayana Book Cover. Chronicle Books. 2010.

Sanjay Patel. Ramayana Book Cover. Chronicle Books. 2010.

Sanjay Patel. Ravana's Penance. Chronicle Books. 2010.

Sanjay Patel. Ravana's Penance. Chronicle Books. 2010.

Sanjay Patel. Ravana Encounters Jatayu. Chronicle Books. 2010.

Sanjay Patel. Ravana Encounters Jatayu. Chronicle Books. 2010.

With his new book, Ramayana: A Divine Loophole, Sanjay Patel, an animator at Pixar, has broken new ground by transposing an ancient epic into one that fits right into urban cool. Drawing on the works of artists such as Tim Biskup and Charley Harper, Sanjay’s Ramayana is unlike any that you may have seen at your religious Indian grandma’s Puja Room.

A transplant from Southern California, Sanjay works out of Oakland, CA. Check out more of his work at GheeHappy.

The Wicked Dragon of Pelmel

23 Jul Aditi Raychoudhury. Forest Fire. 2009. Adobe Illustrator CS.
Aditi Raychoudhury. Forest Fire. 2009. Adobe Illustrator CS.

Aditi Raychoudhury. Forest Fire. 2009. Adobe Illustrator CS.

Aditi Raychoudhury. Forest Fire. 2009. Adobe Illustrator CS.

Aditi Raychoudhury. Forest Fire. 2009. Adobe Illustrator CS.

Aditi Raychoudhury. Forest Fire. 2009. Adobe Illustrator CS.

Aditi Raychoudhury. Forest Fire. 2009. Adobe Illustrator CS.

Aditi Raychoudhury. Forest Fire. 2009. Adobe Illustrator CS.

Aditi Raychoudhury. Forest Fire. 2009. Adobe Illustrator CS.

Synopsis:

‘The Wicked Dragon of Pelmel’ is a story about the addictive nature of power, and its potential to devastate, or, create. When the dragon accidentally discovers his ability to breathe fire, he uses it to terrorize the little creatures of Pelmel Forest. Alarmed by this sudden occurence, these forest creatures get all riled up to hunt down this horrible monster. When they do, they are in for a big surprise! Not only is the dragon sleeping quietly, but looks anything but the terrible monster they had imagined him to be. So they promptly include him in their circle of friendship. Will this innocuous invitation beget the scorching heat of his breath, or the gentle warmth of friendship?

Aditi Raychoudhury. Wicked Dragon. 2009. Adobe Illustrator CS.

Aditi Raychoudhury. Wicked Dragon. 2009. Adobe Illustrator CS.

There was a wicked dragon
And so wicked was he..
That every night
When all slept tight
He went on a burning spree..

Aditi Raychoudhury. Mama Owl. 2009. Adobe Illustrator CS.

Aditi Raychoudhury. Mama Owl. 2009. Adobe Illustrator CS.

“Whoo hooo, whoo hoooooo,
Has lost his grace utter-ly?
What can I do?
About this hullabaloo –
It wakes my chicks up early!

Updated Post: Why Obama’s [Original] Tax Plan Will [Would Have] Help[ed] Us

3 Nov

Its Election day tomorrow. With the economy sliding faster than a ride in “Great America”, we are justifiably nervous about the issues that have featured prominently – albeit not always answered with clarity – in the Presidential debates – the continuing war, government spending, tax reforms, jobs, education, mortages…

Sadly, in the Bay Area, even a 100k annual salary, is, shamefully, short of a mortgage on a three-bedroom home, quality K-12 education, and an occasional night out. The sad state of public schools in some of the Bay Area urban spots – San Francisco, Berkeley, and yes, the infamous Oakland School District, where I live, is testimony to the misplaced priorities even in this otherwise relatively liberal state.

Besides the crumbling public schools, Oakland, CA, also has the dubious distinction of being the homicide capital of America. But I disagree with such stereotyping. It is easier to stereotype than to scratch underneath such definitive descriptions, and find a solution for change. Continue reading

A Rare Find: A Daring, YOUNG AND RENOWNED Architect!

24 Jul
Greg Lynn. Blob Wall. 2008. Plastic. Photo Credit: Ajay Khanna, 2008. 

Greg Lynn. Blob Wall. 2008. Plastic. Photo Credit: Ajay Khanna, 2008.

 

In a profession, where mostly jaded and abusive old men with rich wives or inheritances, have long held sway over jaded and abused young architects till they find their rich spouses or inheritances, Greg Lynn is a breath of fresh air – young, innovative, and refreshing.

Using digital software, Lynn has majorly influenced how we design and conceive space. Lynn’s “paperless” practice brings computers into spatial conception – as opposed to the traditional practice of using digital software to transform an initial sketch into a workable form.

“You define space in the computer with curves,” he says. “Usually an architect would draw points, and connect lines and planes with them. With these programs, we’ve shifted to thinking of space as the sheltered enclosures of a flexible handkerchief.”

Frank Gehry. Disney Concert Hall, Los Angeles. 2003. Photo Credit: Aditi Raychoudhury.

Frank Gehry. Disney Concert Hall, Los Angeles. 2003. Photo Credit: Aditi Raychoudhury.

Not unlike his predecessor, Frank Gehry, Greg Lynn has adopted programs that were developed for auto designers and film animators, to create “biomorphic” forms. Lynn’s forms are spatially and structurally coherent – although the installation here does use a couple of props!

While digital software – typically used for designing aerodynamic structures such as planes and cars – is revolutionizing how we conceive, design and build space, I can not let this “revolution” pass without mentioning Antonio Gaudi, who, long before the age of computers, bent and sculpted space and light in ways that continue to baffle the mind. As a student of architecture, in a computer free generation, I often wondered where would one even start to make the blueprint for the Sagrada Familia.

Antonia Gaudi. Sagrada Familia, Barcelona. 1882-present.

Antonia Gaudi. Sagrada Familia, Barcelona. 1882-present.

A visit to that building more than a decade after I graduated from architecture school, made the answer to that question even more unanswerable. Walking through this building of fluid space, shifting colors and abundant light, even an atheist like me, could understand what drives an overwhelming majority of our populance to seek God.

This feeling of liberation from physical confines, and awe at the limitless capacity of the mind to imagine, and its spirit to persevere, was an unforgettable experience – one that I can’t quite use to describe my experiences at the Disney Concert Hall, Experience Music Project, The Weisman museum, and The Fish.

All in their own way, embody the city they have chosen to call home –

Gehry – neon lights, glamour, silicon and botox, and the disturbing pursuit of eternal youth in Hollywood.

Lynn – cheerful and dynamic like the ocean, skies and pretty wild flowers of the coast.

Gaudi – the fiercely defiant and unflagging spirit of a city that has experienced 2000 years of turbulent history, and home to artists who constantly re-invent – Salvador Dali, Pablo Picasso, Joan Miro, Ferran Adrià Acosta…

 

This Devil Would Wear Prada [Too]..

6 Jul

I happened to see the SS08 Prada campaign in one of those Fashion magazines that one submerges into – in that emotionally vacant interlude between a cheerful, summer day and the Frankensteinian dentist’s chamber. And in those precious moments between gorgeous sun, and plastic Novocaine stupor, I fell in love with the Prada Spring/Summer 2008 Campaign…

Developed and illustrated by Los Angeles artist James Jean – an American of Taiwanese descent and winner of five consecutive Eisner awards, and three consecutive Harvey awards – the art, like the collection, is clever, elegant, sassy, and sexy.

James Jean. Prada Wallpaper for Beverly Hills and SoHo Epicenter stores . Mixed media, approx. 17 x 200 feet, 2007.

James Jean. Prada Wallpaper for Beverly Hills and SoHo Epicenter stores . Mixed media, approx. 17 x 200 feet, 2007.

James Jean. Concept Art for Trembled Blossoms, animated film for Prada S/S 08. Mixed media, variable sizes, 2007-2008.

James Jean. Concept Art for Trembled Blossoms, animated film for Prada S/S 08. Mixed media, variable sizes, 2007-2008.

Check out the Prada Fantasy LookBook. Spring Summer 2008.

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