Strange Tales: Yoshitoshi at the Asian Art Museum, San Francisco

I got interested in Yoshitoshi’s (1839 – 1892) work about a year ago, while reading about Japanese Ghosts and Demons for a story I was conjuring at the time.

japaneseghosts_3.jpg

Kohada Koheiji, killed by his wife and her lover. Hokusai, 1830

He is the last master of traditional ukiyo-e (Pictures of the Floating World). What makes his work distinctive [for me] compared to my other two favorite ukiyo-e artists – Hiroshige and Hokusai – is not only the sinister content of many of his prints, but also the rich colors, complex textures and layers, and an unprecendented dynamism.

Check out:

Yoshitoshi at the Asian Art Museum

His Life and Work

Some of my favorites include:

yoshitoshi14b.jpg

 

 

yoshitoshi22b.jpg

 

yoshitoshi23b.jpg


carp.jpg

1873

moon.jpg

1886

2 thoughts on “Strange Tales: Yoshitoshi at the Asian Art Museum, San Francisco

  1. 「Hokusai. Kohada Koheiji, killed by his wife and her lover. Ukiyo-e. 1830」
    This picture is shifted 90 degrees. Correctly, a skeleton pushes away a mosquito net downward and the skeleton is looking in at the bottom.

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