BookArts: (Jean) Hans Arp

Hans Arp. 1886-1966. Photo Credit: From De Stijl, vol. 7, nr. 73/74 (January 1926).
Hans Arp. 1886-1966. Photo Credit: From De Stijl, vol. 7, nr. 73/74 (January 1926).
Hans Arp. Enak’s Tears (Terrestrial Forms). 1917. Painted wood, 34 x 23 1/8 x 2 3/8”
Hans Arp. Enak’s Tears (Terrestrial Forms). 1917. Painted wood, 34 x 23 1/8 x 2 3/8”
Hans Arp. Forest. 1916. Painted Wood. 12 7/8 x 7 3/4 x 3" (32.7 x 19.7 x 7.6 cm) National Gallery of Art, Washington.
Hans Arp. Forest. 1916. Painted Wood. 12 7/8 x 7 3/4 x 3" (32.7 x 19.7 x 7.6 cm) National Gallery of Art, Washington.

Jean Arp / Hans Arp (16 September 1886 – 7 June 1966) was a German-French sculptor, painter, poet and abstract artist in other media such as torn and pasted paper.

Arp was a founding member of the Dada movement in Zürich in 1916. In 1920, as Hans Arp, along with Max Ernst, and the social activist Alfred Grünwald, he set up the Cologne Dada group. He contributed to the publication “Schammade,” and created the “Fatagaga” pictures with Ernst. He collaboration with Kurt Schwitters on the latter’s periodical “Merz” in 1923. He also published “Die Wolkenpumpe” (“The Cloud Pump”), a series of poems, and “Der Vogel Selbdritt” (“The Bird Thrice with Itself”), a collection of poems and woodcuts, and a collective publication of “Dada in Tyrol, Au Grand Air, Der Sängerkrieg.”

In 1925 his work also appeared in the first exhibition of the surrealist group at the Galerie Pierre in Paris.

In 1931, he broke with the Surrealism movement to found Abstraction-Création, working with the Paris-based group Abstraction-Création and the periodical, Transition.

Throughout the 1930s and until the end of his life, he wrote and published essays and poetry, including the Zürich DaDa-publications “Cabaret Voltaire,” “Dada” (issues 1-3), and “391” (issue #8), he published illustrations; in “Dada” (issue 4/5) and “Der Zeltweg” he published illustrations and poems.