BART People

Aditi Raychoudhury. A Good Time for a Little Make-up. 2000???. Pencil on Xerox Paper.

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Most of these sketches are from when from when I worked as a Energy Efficiency Analyst and Designer and rode BART into the city. I stopped sketching after my first year or so of working, because I coudn’t find any purpose or meaning to them. Now, I wonder who they were? Where are they headed? What are they thinking? Most of all, they remind me of the diverse community I am proud to live in.

Aditi Raychoudhury. A Good Time to Read. 2000???. Pencil on Xerox Paper.
Aditi Raychoudhury. A Good Time to Read. 2000???. Pencil on Xerox Paper.
Aditi Raychoudhury. A Good Time for a Little Make-up. 2000???. Pencil on Xerox Paper.
Aditi Raychoudhury. A Good Time for a Little Make-up. 2000???. Pencil on Xerox Paper.

Where is he from? Where is he going?

Aditi Raychoudhury. Standing Man. 2000???. Pencil on Xerox Paper.
Aditi Raychoudhury. Standing Man. 2000???. Pencil on Xerox Paper.

This man totally reminded me of my late father. What is he pondering?

Aditi Raychoudhury. Just Like my Dad. 2000???. Pencil on Xerox Paper.
Aditi Raychoudhury. Just Like my Dad. 2000???. Pencil on Xerox Paper.

Ban Maggi? Nooooo!!!

Aditi Raychoudhury. Twilight Zone. 2004. Pen and Ink. 8 1/2" x 11".
Aditi Raychoudhury. Twilight Zone. 2004. Pen and Ink. 8 1/2
Aditi Raychoudhury. Twilight Zone. 2004. Pen and Ink. 8 1/2″ x 11″.

The ban over Maggi has become national news in India. And, why not? It even featured prominently in a novel I had illustrated – The Loudest Firecracker.

“Maggi you see is more than just instant noodles. In a socialist India where Coca Cola was forbidden, Maggi from Nestle in the 1980s felt almost like cosmopolitanism in a packet..

“Fast to make and good to eat maggi makes a tasty treat. Maggi maggi maggi”
It broke the rules of cooking. Nothing needed to be chopped, ground or grated. It was East meets West, home meets the world. All with a masala flavor. Everyone had a Maggi memory – the schoolchild’s tiffin, the hostel student’s dinner, the newly-married working couple’s trusty stand by.

Unlike instant noodles in the US which was the epitome of the sad loner with a hot-plate, Maggi managed to sell itself in India as piping hot testimonial of mother’s love. The bright yellow packets still carry the legend Mummy I’m hungry. The ads all feature fond mommies.

Maggi’s sunny cheery ads promised us a snack that kids loved and mothers could serve without feeling any deep-fried guilt.”

From Sandip Roy’s report for KALW. 

And, now for a vintage Maggi commercials to bring back fond memories.

Happy Birthday to My Partner in Crime

Aditi Raychoudhury. The Fake Gift Certificate. Photoshop. 2002.

Back in the day when I couldn’t even afford to spend 25$ on a birthday present. So I created a fake one that actually was good for nothing.

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Aditi Raychoudhury. Amoeba Mail Envelope. Photoshop. 2002
Aditi Raychoudhury. Amoeba Mail Envelope. Photoshop. 2002.
Aditi Raychoudhury. Gift Certificate Envelope (Outside). Photoshop. 2002
Aditi Raychoudhury. Gift Certificate Envelope (Outside). Photoshop. 2002.
Aditi Raychoudhury. Gift Certificate Envelope (Inside). Photoshop. 2002
Aditi Raychoudhury. Gift Certificate Envelope (Inside). Photoshop. 2002.
Aditi Raychoudhury. Gift Certificate (Front). Photoshop. 2002.
Aditi Raychoudhury. Gift Certificate (Front). Photoshop. 2002.
Aditi Raychoudhury. The Fake Gift Certificate. Photoshop. 2002.
Aditi Raychoudhury. The Fake Gift Certificate. Photoshop. 2002.

#Flashback Friday #Creative

Aditi Raychoudhury, Aniruddh Mukerji. Indian Arch Magazine Cover. School of Planning and Architecture, New Delhi. 1994. Paper, Photocopy machine, Glue Stick, Ink.
Aditi Raychoudhury, Aniruddh Mukerji. Indian Arch Magazine Cover.  School of Planning and Architecture, New Delhi. 1994. Paper, Photocopy machine, Glue Stick, Ink.
Aditi Raychoudhury, Aniruddh Mukerji. Indian Arch Magazine Cover. School of Planning and Architecture, New Delhi. 1994. Paper, Photocopy machine, Glue Stick, Ink.

This is one of the many collaborations my husband and I did in the School of Planning and Architecture in New Delhi, India. I thought of this today – as I have a REALLY ANCIENT printer that can’t scan or print anything larger than A4- so I went old school today, while working on this long panoramic (9″x72″ or longer), scanning smaller components, resizing and compositing them in Adobe Illustrator CS5, then printing out the result in small parts,  cutting and pasting them, and redrawing them again. It reminded me of the pre-computer days in college – when used the photocopying machine and glue stick to cutting and paste images in layers and adding hand drawn floor plans and such to create covers and content for magazines.